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20130228
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
, others that want to live in a city, live in a urban environment. don't want to get on a google bus and drive down 101 every day. google and others want to serve the population of their employees. it's food to have opportunities in both places. so this urban, i call them urban hipsters essentially want to stay in san francisco. they're opening offices here. >> does san francisco have a particular niche in the industry or not really? >> you know, it's not the device-heavy kind of cisco, the big data kind of things. it's more in the consumer space, mostly consumer, cloud is here, there's all kinds of companies like that that are here and are in the software or the app space. >> one of the other things that happened this week is texas governor rick perry was making a lot of news saying california's high taxes and tough environmental laws are going to make companies and rich people in the bay area want to move to texas. he's coming here to make this pitch. what are the chances of people en masse leaving silicon valley to go to texas? >> not so much. he makes a lot of noise all the time,
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate over school reform. she has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, i cut a central office bureaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's doing all these co
that are covered, that's all states, municipalities, counties, city governments, in the last ten years there have only been 37 objections. in fact, today chief justice asked the solicitor general in 2005 the year before renewal how many submissions were made of voting changes? 3,700. how many objections were made? just one. the point of that is there is no longer systematic widespread discrimination and the record that congress established did not show that. >> woodruff: sherrilyn? >> that's too narrow a vision of what section 5 does. objections are when the community or jurisdiction proposes a plan, the justice department reviews it and determines that that plan is going to discriminate against minority voters. but there are other things that happen as well. sometimes the jurisdiction submits a plan, the justice department says "we think this plan is problematic, give us more information." and the jurisdiction at that point will decide to withdraw the plan. there are over 800 instances in the period that congress studied in which a jurisdiction did precisely that. >> woodruff: so what about that
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)